Mold Leads to School Closure, Roof Replacement

California's Mold Law - SB 655

Maintenance and engineering managers who conduct multiple roof inspections a year can help ensure the effective performance and lifespan of roofs on commercial and institutional facilities. But when inspections do not occur regularly, potential issues go unnoticed and can become larger problems.

Take the case of K-8 Paideia School 15 in Yonkers, N.Y., where school officials to close the building to hundreds of students. Air tests of a possible mold outbreak came back clear on Oct. 4, but it remains unclear when it will reopen.

There was an emergency closing of the on Sept. 24, when ceiling tiles tested positive for mold. Construction crews are performing a full roof replacement, interior restoration and equipment upgrades. During the construction, the district will perform additional cleaning efforts inside the areas impacted by mold, according to The New Rochelle Daily Voice.

An expert says the wet summer and bountiful rain led to moisture in the building that encouraged the growth of the mold, which became pervasive. The building serves about 576 students and 84 faculty and administrative staff members.

“We have been working very closely with the district to ensure that the safety and well-being of our students remain paramount,” says Mayor Mike Spano, the mayor of Yonkers. “Relocating the students while Paideia School 15 is being remediated is in the best interest of our students and staff.”

Air sample testing found that all areas of the building have been cleared for reoccupancy, says Edwin Quezada. schools superintendent.

Article Source: https://www.facilitiesnet.com/roofing/tip/Mold-Leads-to-School-Closure-Roof-Replacement–42627

Clean indoor air can help reduce asthma attacks

architectural design, architecture, ceiling

Did you know that, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 25 million Americans, including roughly seven million children, have asthma? It’s true, and those numbers have steadily risen in recent years.

Asthma is more than occasional wheezing or feeling out of breath during physical activity. Asthma is chronic and can lead to coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, fast breathing, and chest tightness, states the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. In the 21st century, people spend significant time indoors at home, school or work, and indoor air environments could be triggers for asthma. Improving indoor air quality can help people breathe clearly. The AAFA notes that the following agents can adversely affect indoor air quality, potentially triggering asthma attacks.

Allergens

Allergens such as mold, dust mites, pet dander and fur, and waste from insects or rodents thrive in many homes. Ensuring indoor air quality is high can cut back on the amount of allergens in the air. People with asthma can invest in an air purifier and vacuum regularly, being sure to use a HEPA-equipped appliance. Routinely replacing HVAC system filters can help prevent allergens from blowing around the house. Also, frequent maintenance of HVAC systems will ensure they are operating safely and not contributing to poor indoor air quality.

Mold can be mitigated by reducing moisture in a home. Moist environments in the kitchen and bathroom may promote mold growth. Ventilation is key to keep mold at bay.

Tobacco smoke

Thirdhand smoke, or THS, may be unfamiliar to many people. A 2011 report published in Environmental Health Perspectives says THS is an invisible combination of gases and particles that can cling to clothing, cushions, carpeting, and other materials long after secondhand smoke has cleared from a room. Studies have indicated that residual nicotine levels can be found in house dust where people smoke or once smoked. Studies have indicated that smoke compounds can adsorb onto surfaces and then desorb back into air over time.

Keeping tobacco smoke out of a home can improve indoor air quality and personal health.

VOCs

Volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, are gases released from commonly used products. These can include paints and varnishes, cleaning supplies, air fresheners, new furniture, and new carpet. People with asthma may find that VOCs can trigger attacks. Airing out items, reducing usage of products that are heavily scented and choosing low- or no-VOC products can help. Making cleaning products from baking soda, vinegar and liquid oil soap also can keep indoor air quality high.

Homeowners who plan to renovate their homes can consider using the appropriate specifications for HVAC systems to promote good indoor air, as well as address any other potential problems that may be compromising indoor air quality.

Article Source: https://lompocrecord.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/clean-indoor-air-can-help-reduce-asthma-attacks/article_ea6cbc20-ed35-58fe-a9d9-823706754c89.html

Clearing the Air on Indoor Air Quality | 2019 Annual Meeting January 14 – 16, 2019

Registration Now Open for IAQA’s 2019 Annual Meeting

The IAQA Annual Meeting will be held at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis
265 Peachtree Center Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia 30303

3-Day Conference Registration

Includes:

    • Access to the 40+ sessions in this year’s Technical Program
    • Access to final papers and presentations
    • Eligibility for Continuing Education Credits

Admission to:

  • AHR Expo & Exclusive IAQA VIP Service (January 14– 16)
  • Welcome Reception (January 14)
  • Networking Coffee and Danish (January 14-16)
  • Conference Lunch (January 15)
  • Annual Meeting of the General Membership (January 15)
  • Hall of Fame Awards Ceremony (January 15)
  • Discussion Panels (January 14-16)

Early Bird
Registration
Oct 22 –
Nov 16

Regular
Registration
Nov 17 –
Jan 16

IAQA Member – First Attendee $695 $745
IAQA Member – Additional Attendees* $595 $645
Non-Member – First Attendee $835 $885
Non-Member – Additional Attendees* $695 $745

To join IAQA, please visit www.iaqa.org/membership.

*Additional attendee registration is open to employees within the same company.

Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-conference Workshops will be held on January 13, 2019.

“Cannabis! Fentanyl! Methampetamine! Oh My”
Presented by Susan Kimball and Coreen Robbins
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
$175 member
$295 non-member
“Novel and Traditional Microbiological Methods for Common Indoor Microbial Investigations”
Presented by Wei Tang
8:30 am – 12:30 pm
$175 member
$295 non-member
“Infection Prevention Considerations in Healthcare Design, Construction, and Maintenance”
Presented by JJ Jenkins
8:30 am – 5:00 pm
$275 member
$395 non-member
“Indoor Air Quality Monitoring – A New Toolkit for the 21st Century”
Presented by Louie Chang
8:30 am – 12:30 pm
$175 member
$295 non-member

Daily Conference Registration

Includes:

  • Access to the full day’s technical sessions
  • Access to final papers and presentations
  • Eligibility for Continuing Education Credits
  • Admission to the AHR Expo, the world’s largest HVACR expo
Monday, January 14, 2019 ONLY $350 member
$450 non-member
Tuesday, January 15, 2019 ONLY $350 member
$450 non-member
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 ONLY $300 member
$400 non-member

Spouse Registration

Spouse registration can only be purchased with a full three-day registration package. Spouses are not allowed entry into the IAQA Technical Program. This additional fee includes admission to:

  • AHR Expo (January 14 – 16)
  • Conference Lunch (January 14)
  • Welcome Reception (January 13)
  • Hall of Fame Awards Ceremony (January 14)
Spouse Registration $322

CANCELLATION POLICY: Cancellation requests must be sent in writing to registration@iaqa.org by January 14, 2019. Cancellations are subject to a $75 per person service fee that will be deducted from your refund. Refunds are not available after January 14, 2019, under any circumstances, but substitute attendees will be accepted.

Article Source: http://www.iaqa.org/annual-meeting/registration-information/

The dangers of mold: what you need to know

Mold Inspections LA | Not only is mold unsightly, but there are also numerous dangers of mold-mildew that can result in a variety of problems; from a mildew mite infestation for an allergic reaction. Mold accumulates in wet as well as poorly ventilated buildings. Combined with the apparent mildew, there may a distressing odor, water discolorations, condensation, peeling or damaged paint or wall structure paper, a wet basement, and position water under or about the house.

Based on the World Health Company (WHO), 15 percent of dwellings in cold climates have signals of dampness and 5 percent have signals of mildew problems. The numbers in warm climates are 20 percent for dampness and 25 percent for mold. This problem is more common in low-income communities and rental accommodations, often due to lack of appropriate ventilation, heating, and insulation. Plus, global warming and its effect on the weather can boost the problem of mold and dampness even more. Mold is harmful and toxic due to the mycotoxins, which may contribute to several health problems. More than 50 molds are considered including stachybotrys, difficult, alternaria, trichoderma and cladosporium.

Exposure to mildew inside a home can have profound effects on your health through skin ingestion, contact and inhalation. After all, you spend several hours a day at home. Plus, children and elderly people with fragile immunities spend most of their time indoors.

Here are the top hidden risks of toxic mold exposure that you must know. The dangers of mold?

Asthma

Prolonged exposure to high levels of interior dampness can lead to chronic health problems like asthma. According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 6 million children in the United States have asthma. While genes play a lead role, child years asthma, in addition, has been associated with indoor mildew growing in a child’s home. Within a 2003 research released in the American Journal of Epidemiology, research workers analyzed several studies and reported that there surely is constant evidence that dampness exacerbates preexisting respiratory conditions like asthma, however they said it had not been clear whether it also causes these conditions.

Later, a 2012 research published in Environmental Health Perspectives reported that mildew publicity during early youth increases the threat of asthma by 80 percent. Aside from asthma, mildew publicity is also associated with bronchitis. A 2010 research published in Environmental Health reported that residential dampness and mildew are associated with substantial and statistically critical increases in both respiratory infections and bronchitis. It emphasized managing dampness and mold in buildings to prevent a substantial proportion of respiratory infections.

The association between mold and asthma, and also bronchitis, makes it more important to remediate water damage in homes, particularly in lower-income, urban communities where the problem of the mold is a common issue.

Rhinitis Infection

Household molds boost the risk of rhinitis. In fact, those already suffering from a rhinitis illness will have more severe symptoms when exposed to mold. A 2010 study published in the Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society reports that although indoor dampness or mold exposure in relation to rhinitis symptoms does not have a strong relationship, there is a strong connection between high in-home fungal concentrations and development of allergic rhinitis in a child’s first five many years of life.

A subsequent 2013 meta-analysis published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology provides evidence that dampness and mildew publicity at home are determinants of rhinitis and its own allergic rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, and subcategories. The organizations were most powerful with mold smell, suggesting the need for microbial causal real estate agents.

Headaches

If you’re hanging out in a mold-affected home and you also get frequent headaches, the reason why may be mildew toxicity. Headaches, including migraine headaches, are common outcomes of mildew toxicity. Mold can result in headaches or a migraine consequently of an allergic attack to mildew spores in the air. It could even be credited to sinus pressure the effect of a sinus disease or swelling of the mucous membranes in the nose cavities.

Along with headaches, you may even have problems with fatigue and tiredness. Furthermore, you might experience pain in muscle tissue and joints. To prevent headaches and migraines credited to mold toxins, you’ll need to eliminate your exposure to mold.

Weak Immunity

Mold toxins can even affect the body’s immune system, thus making you more prone to illness. Heavily infested homes can have fungi that can produce volatile natural and organic compounds, which impair the disease fighting capability. The problem is actually common in small kids, whose immune systems aren’t fully developed. When their physiques are exposed to mildew or antigens, their immune system systems may react abnormally, creating regular health problems.

Based on the American Academy of Pediatrics, toxic results from mold could cause severe health issues in babies, including acute vomiting, diarrhea, asthma attacks and even pulmonary hemorrhaging in severe instances. Actually, long-term exposure can result in death. Not only children, even people living around toxic dark mold for long hours are more susceptible to get attacks and be sick.

Eye Problems

Homes heavily infested with mildew can cause eyesight and eyesight problems, too.

Mycotoxins can be there in the air, thereby easily getting into a person’s eye. The mycotoxins are poisonous to cells, so when they touch the cells in your eye, they cause problems. Toxins in the mold can cause eye problems like inflammation in the eyes, soreness, watery eyes, bloodshot eyes and blurry vision, to name a few.

Skin Rashes

Toxic mold can enter your body through the minute pores present on your skin. Those who have sensitive skin can suffer from severe skin problems, especially after exposure to black mold.

The symptoms may include skin inflammation, pink or brown skin rashes, blisters and severe itchiness. At times, it can cause yellowing of the skin as if you are suffering from jaundice.

A rash due to mold can be very itchy and excessive scratching increases the risk of breaking the skin and triggering an infection. This type of skin problem may need antibiotics or other treatments prescribed by a health care provider.

So long as you remain subject to mildew, you are likely to have signs or symptoms, despite having treatment. To eliminate the mold-related epidermis problems, you will need to avoid mold-affected areas completely.

Article Source: http://vinhome-nguyentrai.net/the-dangers-of-mold-what-you-need-to-know/

Asbestos forces compound closure

Asbestos

GLEN Aplin bin compound has been forcibly shut after traces of asbestos were uncovered at the facility.

Four samples of suspected Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) were tested and returned a positive result on Monday after the material was detected by a Southern Downs Regional Council officer on Friday.

The facility will be closed for at least two weeks while SDRC takes precautions to remedy the site.

Accredited personnel have been engaged to come in, collect and safely dispose of the material.

Residents who use the compound will be directed to either Stanthorpe or Ballandean for waste disposal while the facility is closed. Southern Downs mayor Tracy Dobie said people had been put at risk by the illegal dumping.

“Incorrectly disposing of asbestos is not only illegal but totally irresponsible. We all know the risks associated with exposure to asbestos,” Cr Dobie said.

“I’d like to remind everyone in the community that asbestos is a hazardous waste and it puts community members, contractors and council officers who use the facility at risk.

“If you are dealing with material which contains asbestos you have a legal responsibility to do the right thing and to dispose of the material properly; to be aware of material which may contain asbestos, how to handle it properly and where and how to dispose of it correctly.

“Some people may simply be unaware of asbestos in or around the home. If you are unsure, take precautions – contact council or someone who specialises in asbestos removal.”

Disposing of asbestos is prohibited at all SDRC waste management facilities, except for Warwick, where asbestos can be disposed of properly by appointment and for a small fee.

Stanthorpe Waste Facility is currently not accepting ACM until a new dedicated disposal bin is installed at the site.

The illegal dumping at Glen Aplin comes just weeks after asbestos containing material was identified at Collegians Junior Rugby League Club in Warwick as a result of illegal dumping at Allora Waste Transfer Facility.

Following on from that discovery, soil testing confirmed the presence of bonded asbestos at five other sites around the Southern Downs.

Workplace Health and Safety Queensland confirmed traces had been found at the Collegians club, as well as Warwick Central School.

A WHSQ spokesman said four other sites were located in the Southern Downs, but declined to reveal further details.

Cr Dobie said illegal dumping is not only illegal but comes at a cost to ratepayers.

EARLIER:

THE Glen Aplin bin compound has been closed after traces of asbestos were discovered.

Southern Downs Regional Council say some illegal dumping of asbestos containing material has occurred, forcing them to shut the facility.

Accredited specialists will be brought in to clean up the hazardous material.

The clean up will come at a cost to ratepayers and come as an inconvenience to Glen Aplin residents.

It comes a few weeks after several sites around Warwick and the wider Southern Downs tested positive for small amounts of asbestos debris.

Article Source: https://www.warwickdailynews.com.au/news/update-asbestos-forces-compound-closure/3524219/