The dangers of mold: what you need to know

Not only is mold unsightly, there are numerous associated risks of mildew that can result in a variety of problems; from a mildew mite infestation for an allergic reaction. Mold accumulates in wet as well as poorly ventilated buildings. Combined with the apparent mildew, there may a distressing odor, water discolorations, condensation, peeling or damaged paint or wall structure paper, a wet basement, and position water under or about the house.

Based on the World Health Company (WHO), 15 percent of dwellings in cold climates have signals of dampness and 5 percent have signals of mildew problems. The numbers in warm climates are 20 percent for dampness and 25 percent for mold. This problem is more common in low-income communities and rental accommodations, often due to lack of appropriate ventilation, heating, and insulation. Plus, global warming and its effect on the weather can boost the problem of mold and dampness even more. Mold is harmful and toxic due to the mycotoxins, which may contribute to several health problems. More than 50 molds are considered including stachybotrys, difficult, alternaria, trichoderma and cladosporium.

Exposure to mildew inside a home can have profound effects on your health through skin ingestion, contact and inhalation. After all, you spend several hours a day at home. Plus, children and elderly people with fragile immunities spend most of their time indoors.

Here are the top hidden risks of toxic mold exposure that you must know. The dangers of mold?

Asthma

Prolonged exposure to high levels of interior dampness can lead to chronic health problems like asthma. According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 6 million children in the United States have asthma. While genes play a lead role, child years asthma, in addition, has been associated with indoor mildew growing in a child’s home. Within a 2003 research released in the American Journal of Epidemiology, research workers analyzed several studies and reported that there surely is constant evidence that dampness exacerbates preexisting respiratory conditions like asthma, however they said it had not been clear whether it also causes these conditions.

Later, a 2012 research published in Environmental Health Perspectives reported that mildew publicity during early youth increases the threat of asthma by 80 percent. Aside from asthma, mildew publicity is also associated with bronchitis. A 2010 research published in Environmental Health reported that residential dampness and mildew are associated with substantial and statistically critical increases in both respiratory infections and bronchitis. It emphasized managing dampness and mold in buildings to prevent a substantial proportion of respiratory infections.

The association between mold and asthma, and also bronchitis, makes it more important to remediate water damage in homes, particularly in lower-income, urban communities where the problem of the mold is a common issue.

Rhinitis Infection

Household molds boost the risk of rhinitis. In fact, those already suffering from a rhinitis illness will have more severe symptoms when exposed to mold. A 2010 study published in the Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society reports that although indoor dampness or mold exposure in relation to rhinitis symptoms does not have a strong relationship, there is a strong connection between high in-home fungal concentrations and development of allergic rhinitis in a child’s first five many years of life.

A subsequent 2013 meta-analysis published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology provides evidence that dampness and mildew publicity at home are determinants of rhinitis and its own allergic rhinitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, and subcategories. The organizations were most powerful with mold smell, suggesting the need for microbial causal real estate agents.

Headaches

If you’re hanging out in a mold-affected home and you also get frequent headaches, the reason why may be mildew toxicity. Headaches, including migraine headaches, are common outcomes of mildew toxicity. Mold can result in headaches or a migraine consequently of an allergic attack to mildew spores in the air. It could even be credited to sinus pressure the effect of a sinus disease or swelling of the mucous membranes in the nose cavities.

Along with headaches, you may even have problems with fatigue and tiredness. Furthermore, you might experience pain in muscle tissue and joints. To prevent headaches and migraines credited to mold toxins, you’ll need to eliminate your exposure to mold.

Weak Immunity

Mold toxins can even affect the body’s immune system, thus making you more prone to illness. Heavily infested homes can have fungi that can produce volatile natural and organic compounds, which impair the disease fighting capability. The problem is actually common in small kids, whose immune systems aren’t fully developed. When their physiques are exposed to mildew or antigens, their immune system systems may react abnormally, creating regular health problems.

Based on the American Academy of Pediatrics, toxic results from mold could cause severe health issues in babies, including acute vomiting, diarrhea, asthma attacks and even pulmonary hemorrhaging in severe instances. Actually, long-term exposure can result in death. Not only children, even people living around toxic dark mold for long hours are more susceptible to get attacks and be sick.

Eye Problems

Homes heavily infested with mildew can cause eyesight and eyesight problems, too.

Mycotoxins can be there in the air, thereby easily getting into a person’s eye. The mycotoxins are poisonous to cells, so when they touch the cells in your eye, they cause problems. Toxins in the mold can cause eye problems like inflammation in the eyes, soreness, watery eyes, bloodshot eyes and blurry vision, to name a few.

Skin Rashes

Toxic mold can enter your body through the minute pores present on your skin. Those who have sensitive skin can suffer from severe skin problems, especially after exposure to black mold.

The symptoms may include skin inflammation, pink or brown skin rashes, blisters and severe itchiness. At times, it can cause yellowing of the skin as if you are suffering from jaundice.

A rash due to mold can be very itchy and excessive scratching increases the risk of breaking the skin and triggering an infection. This type of skin problem may need antibiotics or other treatments prescribed by a health care provider.

So long as you remain subject to mildew, you are likely to have signs or symptoms, despite having treatment. To eliminate the mold-related epidermis problems, you will need to avoid mold-affected areas completely.

Article Source: http://vinhome-nguyentrai.net/the-dangers-of-mold-what-you-need-to-know/

Blackburn sues over residence hall mold flare-up

CARLINVILLE – Following years of mold troubles in one of its residence halls, Blackburn College administrators have decided to sue the company that installed its heating and air conditioning system, alleging that poor design triggered a dorm-wide mold outbreak.

The lawsuit, which was filed in Macoupin County court, is seeking at least $600,000 in damages from Henson Robinson Co., the Springfield-based HVAC company that performed the design and installation of the system in Jewell Hall, the largest of the college’s six dormitories. Administrators estimated mold cleanup had cost the school at least $200,000 and that tearing out the system and replacing it will cost $400,000.

In the lawsuit, which presents only one side of a case, administrators said the HVAC system, which was installed in 2012 and 2013 at a cost of $322,986, was a problem from the beginning.

“From the onset, the system installed by Henson Robinson experienced problems with its functionality,” the lawsuit said. “For example, Henson Robinson’s design did not fit the space available for piping, there were various issues with condensate lines and related design issues. Blackburn worked to ensure Henson Robinson addressed these issues and in the summer of 2013, Jewell Hall was turned over to Blackburn for student use.”

More failures followed, the lawsuit contends. According to the suit, “once turned over to Blackburn, the condensate pumps immediately failed and additional sweating and leaks occurred with the system along with thermostat problems in virtually all of the dormitory rooms.”

Then, in October 2014, students living in Jewell Hall began complaining of mold growth in their rooms. The college moved the students to different rooms while the mold was cleared. While the college battled mold for nearly two years, the problem eventually became so significant that administrators arranged for a major inspection in December 2016. Students were paid to put their belongings into storage for the duration of the inspection. According to the suit, the inspection turned up mold in nearly every room in Jewel Hall. College administrators hired an outside firm to determine what was causing the problems.

“After investigation and sampling, Blackburn’s consultants concluded that the mold growth in Jewell Hall was attributable to extreme levels of humidity … trapped in Jewell Hall dormitory by the system designed and installed by defendant,” the suit said. “Likewise, Blackburn’s consultants concluded that the [HVAC system] had been ‘over-designed’ in such a manner as to create negative pressure in the Jewell Hall dorms resulting in significantly increased humidity and mold growth.”

Henson Robinson, according to the court filing, has denied any responsibility. Lawyers for the college said the company recommended students leave their windows open to address the problem and called the refusal to take responsibility for the mold problem “shocking.”

According to the filings, the mold problem is ongoing, and students are still displaced as a result.

Article Source: https://www.myjournalcourier.com/news/article/Blackburn-sues-over-residence-hall-mold-flare-up-12740466.php

Mould released by melting snow sends allergy sufferers in search of relief

Now that spring is starting to arrive in Calgary, tiny spores that have been lurking under the snow are starting to emerge too, and that has allergy sufferers running to the pharmacy.

Allergy experts say some of those early season symptoms may be due to spores in the air as fast melting snow exposes mould that has been growing on lawns and rotting leaves over the winter.

  • ‘Now your snow season begins’: Calgary hasn’t turned the winter corner yet
  • Allergies in spring? Snow mould may be to blame

Calgary allergist Dr. Joel Doctor estimates five per cent of the population could be allergic to the mould.

But allergy season typically only reaches its peak in June and July, once pollen production picks up in grass and trees, he said.

mouldy snow

Fast melting snow is starting to expose mould that has been growing on lawns and rotting leaves over the winter. (CBC)

“It’s really hard to predict how the allergy season is going to unfold because it will depend an awful lot on what the precipitation is like going forward and what the temperature is like,” he said.

But he adds the symptoms should be controllable and nobody should have to suffer through seasonal allergies.

Pharmacist Debbie Boyle says this is one of the times of the year when she typically sees an allergy-related rush at her pharmacy in Britannia.

“We see more people coming in with questions about their stuffy noses or runny noses or people asking what they can do about their itchy eyes, so the season is here,” she said.

Boyle says she typically recommends over-the-counter medication such as anti-histamines and nasal irrigation. If the symptoms persist, she tells patients to consult their family doctor.

Snow mould

Once the snow leaves, a webbing of snow mould starts to show on lawns across the city.

Article Source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/spring-allergies-snow-mouldy-doctor-joel-1.4034466

IAQA Los Angeles Mold Meeting

IAQA Los Angeles - Certified Mold Inspectors and Environmental Professionals Indoor Air Quality Association Meeting Los Angeles Sept. 2016 Providing Continuing Education Units

Join the IAQA Los Angeles/Orange County Chapter

Indoor Air Quality Association General Meeting

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

 LOCATION

Armstrong Hall

2400 N. Canal
Orange, CA 92865

 

DATE AND TIME

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

7:30 – 11:30 am

 

COST

IAQA Members: $50
Non-members: $65

20% of net proceeds will be donated to Ride for Kids.

SCHEDULE:

7:30 – 8:00 am Breakfast with coffee and juices
8:00 – 8:20 am Opening remarks
8:20 – 9:10 am Presentation by John Chadwell
9:10 – 9:25 am Break
9:25 – 10:15 am Presentation by Derrick Denis
10:15 – 10:30 am Break
10:30 – 11:30 am Presentation by Alan Johanns
Los Angeles Certified Mold Inspector IAQA Courses for Continuing Education 2016
 LOCATION

Armstrong Hall

2400 N. Canal
Orange, CA 92865

 

DATE AND TIME

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

7:30 – 11:30 am

 

COST

IAQA Members: $50
Non-members: $65

20% of net proceeds will be donated to Ride for Kids.

  

REGISTRATION

Please send your registration and payment form to Nicole Adams at nadams@falaboratories.com.

We accept checks, Visa, MasterCard, and Discover.

72 hour cancellation policy.

  

CONTINUING EDUCATION

Earn one (1) renewal credit from ACAC with documented attendance for this workshop.

  

FUTURE MEETINGS

November 9, 2016
7:30am – 11:30am

PRESENTATIONS:

“Active Shooter Primer” – John Chadwell
We will cover some society contributing factors (technology vs human interaction), past and most recent events, where the attackers (threats) are coming from; what mitigation steps can be done, what options exist during an event, how to effectively respond (run, hide, fight). A few other details will be addressed as well.

 

“‘Sii Preparato’ – Ready Yourself for Your Worst Day” – Derrick Denis
Focus on what YOU, THE INDIVIDUAL can do to make a difference in protecting your safety and the safety of those around you on a daily basis. It will challenge common myths misconceptions. It will modify the perspective of the group. I will provide practical and tactical tips and tricks to assess, avoid and confront deadly situations. The content will be sobering and immediately empowering.

 

“The California $1.1 BILLION Dollar Lead Lawsuit Settlement” – Alan Johanns
On January 7, 2014, the Honorable James P. Kleinberg of the Santa Clara Superior Court issued a Statement of Decision finalizing his December 2013 ruling that three lead paint companies created a public nuisance by concealing the dangers of lead, pursued a campaign against regulation of lead and actively promoted lead for use in homes, despite knowing that lead paint was highly toxic. The Court ruled in favor of the People of the State of California. Defendants against whom judgment is entered, jointly and severally, shall pay to the State of California $1,150,000,000 (One Billion One Hundred Fifty Million Dollars). 10 cities and counties will share this fund amount, of which over $600 Million will go to LA County.

Learn how your firm, can participate in the fund disbursements through remediation, consulting, and laboratory services. The funds have to be used by 2019. Join Alan Johanns from the California Health Housing Coalition for this presentation and background information in growing your business

IAQA Los Angeles

IAQA Los Angeles meeting for Certified Mold Inspectors and Environmental Professionals

IAQA Los Angeles Meeting - Contact Us

1 + 3 =

IAQA Meeting Los Angeles Sept. 2016 Continuing Education Units for Certified Mold Inspectors and Environmental Professionals ACAC Credits

Mold in Breast Implants

Embedded image permalinkMore than 300,000 women get breast implants every year in the U.S. A Shalimar, Florida, woman has a warning for them.

She says her implants nearly killed her. You may have seen some of the articles popping up on Facebook and various websites, linking mold in saline implants to a host of health problems. Anne Ziegenhorn says they are frighteningly accurate.

If Ziegenhorn had known the price she’d pay for beauty, she would have run the other way. She said, “It’s not a story a multi-billion dollar industry wants to get out.”

Anne keeps a video on her phone of the saline breast implants covered with mold, that were removed from her body after a two-year nightmare.

“I felt like that was it, I was gonna die, and the doctors were gonna let me die,” Ziegenhorn said.

It started in 2011. The woman who was a picture of health suddenly started gaining weight, losing her vision and experiencing burning, unrelenting pain. She had sores all over her body. Her thinking was so cloudy she thought she might have Alzheimer’s. She was misdiagnosed with everything from lupus to arthritis to thyroid problems. She said, “Silicone sickness in and of itself is one entity. And then you add the mold to it that we had, and then you’ve got two illnesses going on.”

The diagnosis that Anne believes saved her life came from Dr. Susan Kolb, author of “The naked truth about breast implants.” Dr. Kolb said.

My experience in doing this for 30 years is that eventually everybody will become ill from their breast implants, unless they die sooner from something else.

Dr. Kolb says she’s seeing lots of women with mold in their saline implants, often from defective valves. She says some patients also have detoxification problems, that make them particularly sensitive to the silicone shells of the implants. She says in 25-30 percent of the population, the reactions are debilitating. The doctor is not anti-implants, she has them herself. But she believes for safety, women need to get their implants replaced every eight to fifteen years. Amanda Gilcrease is a patient who had her implants removed. She said, “All the neurological symptoms… the burning, numbing, stabbing, shooting, electrical shocking pains throughout my body went away immediately.”

Through Dr. Kolb, Anne Ziegenhorn met other women suffering the same frightening symptoms. They formed “The Implant Truth Survivors Committee” to educate women and doctors, and to force the FDA to listen. She said, “I literally willed myself to live and willed myself to get this message out here This is my purpose, this is why I’m here.”

Channel 3 called the FDA to see if they’re getting any reports of illnesses from mold in saline implants or from the silicone shells. Their spokesperson said he’s not familiar with any such reports. The agency does say that most women will eventually need to have their implants replaced.

Reference: http://www.news3lv.com/content/news/story/Florida-woman-finds-mold-in-breast-implants/XjSS-AV_6kyspkB1fmrTIA.cspx

Fungi or FunGuy or Mold?

Fungi or FunGuy or Mold?

Fungi, FunGuy, Mold Inspections in Reseda CA

Does anybody recognize this fungi?

 

A fungus (/ˈfʌŋɡəs/; plural: fungi or funguses) is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes unicellular microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as multicellular fungi that produce familiar fruiting forms known as mushrooms.

 

These organisms are classified as a kingdom, Fungi, which is separate from the other life kingdoms of plants, animals, protists, and bacteria. One difference that places fungi in a different kingdom is that its cell walls contain chitin, unlike the cell walls of plants, bacteria and some protists. Similar to animals, fungi are heterotrophs, that is, they acquire their food by absorbing dissolved molecules, typically by secreting digestive enzymes into their environment. Growth is their means of mobility, except for spores, which may travel through the air or water (a few of which are flagellated). Fungi are the principal decomposers in ecological systems. These and other differences place fungi in a single group of related organisms, named the Eumycota (true fungi or Eumycetes), that share a common ancestor (is a monophyletic group). This fungal group is distinct from the structurally similar myxomycetes (slime molds) and oomycetes (water molds). The discipline of biology devoted to the study of fungi is known as mycology (from the Greek μύκης, mukēs, meaning “fungus”). In the past, mycology was regarded as a branch of botany; today it is a separate kingdom in biological taxonomy. Genetic studies have shown that fungi are more closely related to animals than to plants.