Is Formaldehyde in your wood flooring?

Is Formaldehyde in your wood flooring?

Lumber Liquidators violated California’s air-quality controls by importing wood with formaldehyde

Beleaguered flooring retailer Lumber Liquidators is paying $2.5 million to settle allegations that some of its products violated California’s air-safety standards.

The penalty announced Tuesday was the latest that Lumber Liquidators has absorbed for formerly selling laminate flooring made in China.

In this case, Lumber Liquidators faced allegations that the imported flooring contained high levels of the carcinogen formaldehyde that violated California’s air-quality controls. The flooring was sold at Lumber Liquidators’ California stores from September 2013 until May 2015 when the retailer suspended sales of the products made in China.

Lumber Liquidators currently operates 40 of its 375 stores in California.

The Toano, Virginia, company didn’t acknowledge any wrongdoing in the settlement with the California Air Resources Board. Lumber Liquidators Pays $2.5M Over formaldehyde in Flooring

Last year, Lumber Liquidators paid $13.2 million in fines and pleaded guilty to environmental crimes for importing China-made flooring that contained timber illegally logged in eastern Russia.

Lumber Liquidators still faces a variety of class-action lawsuits revolving around the formaldehyde levels of the China-made flooring.

Read More: CDC Revises Lumber Liquidators Flooring Cancer Risk

The legal fallout so far has been less costly to Lumber Liquidators than the damage done to its stock since investigation shown slightly more than a year ago “60 Minutes” raised questions about whether the retailer was selling potentially hazardous flooring.

Shares of Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc. have plunged more than 70 percent since the TV program aired, a downturn that has wiped out more than $1 billion in stockholder wealth. The shares rallied Tuesday, gaining $1.74 to $13.76 in afternoon trading.

Formaldehydeinmywoodflooring

What is formaldehyde?

Formaldehyde is a colorless, flammable, strong-smelling chemical that is used in building materials and to produce many household products. It is used in pressed-wood products, such as particleboard, plywood, and fiberboard; glues and adhesives; permanent-press fabrics; paper product coatings; and certain insulation materials. In addition, formaldehyde is commonly used as an industrial fungicide, germicide, and disinfectant, and as a preservative in mortuaries and medical laboratories. Formaldehyde also occurs naturally in the environment. It is produced in small amounts by most living organisms as part of normal metabolic processes.

How is the general population exposed to formaldehyde?

According to a 1997 report by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, formaldehyde is normally present in both indoor and outdoor air at low levels, usually less than 0.03 parts of formaldehyde per million parts of air (ppm). Materials containing formaldehyde can release formaldehyde gas or vapor into the air. One source of formaldehyde exposure in the air is automobile tailpipe emissions.

During the 1970s, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) was used in many homes. However, few homes are now insulated with UFFI. Homes in which UFFI was installed many years ago are not likely to have high formaldehyde levels now. Pressed-wood products containing formaldehyde resins are often a significant source of formaldehyde in homes. Other potential indoor sources of formaldehyde include cigarette smoke and the use of unvented fuel-burning appliances, such as gas stoves, wood-burning stoves, and kerosene heaters.

Industrial workers who produce formaldehyde or formaldehyde-containing products, laboratory technicians, certain health care professionals, and mortuary employees may be exposed to higher levels of formaldehyde than the general public. Exposure occurs primarily by inhaling formaldehyde gas or vapor from the air or by absorbing liquids containing formaldehyde through the skin.

http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/substances/formaldehyde/formaldehyde-fact-sheet

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/lumber-liquidators-pays-2-5m-over-carcinogen-flooring-n544041

Moms beware of mold in sippy cups

A sippy cup company is under fire.

Two moms from Montreal shared unnerving photos of Tommee Tippee sippy cups on Facebook, Buzzfeed reports.

These photos show moldy sippy cups. Worse, the women allege that people can’t get rid of the mold when they try washing the cups.

Unsurprisingly, the moms are not happy about this.

According to Marie-Pier S. L’Hostie’s post (translated from French), her friend was wondering why his son had gotten sick, so he called Tommee Tipee. He got an unfortunate response.

She wrote:

“My friend Simon O’kanada wondered why his son was always sick. He broke the anti-spill top of his ‘Tommee Tippee’ bottle and discovered mold inside the mouthpiece. It doesn’t wash and can’t be seen unless it is broken open. He called the company, and the lady on the phone laughed out out loud. Several moms on other groups have also discovered mold after my post in another Facebook group, so I’m sharing you. If you please, those who have these cups, pay attention! Being washed by hand or in the dishwasher, the mold will stay there!”

Her friend Penny Powell shared the story (and nasty photos) as well, and said that the unsettling mold could only be seen if it the anti-spill top was broken open. She wrote that other mothers in a Facebook group complained about the issue.

She encouraged parents to share the issue and to complain to the company.

The photos that the women shared tell the story — there’s tons of mold right below where the mouthpiece is.

tommee tippee molFacebook/Penny Powell

tommee tippee moldFacebook/Penny Powell

Tommee Tippee responded in a Facebook post to the angry parents, apologizing and claiming to be “actively working on the subject.”

The company pointed to an FAQ section on its site describing how to pope-rly use the cups, but also said that the company could not find “any trace of the conversation with [the original friend who discussed the issue], however we ask him to contact us by private message so that we can answer him directly.”

In a statement to Buzzfeed, the company advised consumers to use the cups with “recommended liquids” which include “cold, light fluids including water and non-pulp juice” and to clean the cups according to the instructions. ” Difficulties have arisen though when liquids that are not recommended for use in the cups have been used, like thick formula milk, pulpy juice and warm liquids. We also recommend that cups are not left for long periods before being cleaned,” the company added.

Tommee Tippee did say in the statement that “we understand that the well being of little ones is paramount and we can reassure all parents that we have extensively tested the valves,” and again, encouraged troubled. consumers to reach out ot them.

You can view the original Facebook complaints in full below.

http://www.businessinsider.com/moldy-sippy-cup-photos-2016-2

Different fungi that grow in buildings

Different fungi that grow in buildingswhy does mold grow on the floor in my home find a certified mold inspector

These recent fungi, mold, and mushrooms were observed on the inside of a home.  Fungi grow for numerous reasons in buildings and structures, including the presence of water damage or moisture intrusion.

 

Some fungi and mushrooms are able to import moisture from other source outside the home and continue growing even if the moisture source is eradicated.  This complex rooting system allows the fungi and molds to grow in the absence of moisture leak or water damage.

 

Although this is not probably not a indoor air quality problem, it is a problem for the building or structure.  With continuing growth of this fungi, the organism digests the cellulose within the wood, drywall, and other building components of the structure.

 

Experts familiar with this type of mold growth should be called to help diagnose the extent of contamination and present a pragmatic solution to eradicate the problem.

 

Read More > > > http://funguyinspections.com/poria-incrassata-problems-in-los-angeles/

 

Mold in Breast Implants

Embedded image permalinkMore than 300,000 women get breast implants every year in the U.S. A Shalimar, Florida, woman has a warning for them.

She says her implants nearly killed her. You may have seen some of the articles popping up on Facebook and various websites, linking mold in saline implants to a host of health problems. Anne Ziegenhorn says they are frighteningly accurate.

If Ziegenhorn had known the price she’d pay for beauty, she would have run the other way. She said, “It’s not a story a multi-billion dollar industry wants to get out.”

Anne keeps a video on her phone of the saline breast implants covered with mold, that were removed from her body after a two-year nightmare.

“I felt like that was it, I was gonna die, and the doctors were gonna let me die,” Ziegenhorn said.

It started in 2011. The woman who was a picture of health suddenly started gaining weight, losing her vision and experiencing burning, unrelenting pain. She had sores all over her body. Her thinking was so cloudy she thought she might have Alzheimer’s. She was misdiagnosed with everything from lupus to arthritis to thyroid problems. She said, “Silicone sickness in and of itself is one entity. And then you add the mold to it that we had, and then you’ve got two illnesses going on.”

The diagnosis that Anne believes saved her life came from Dr. Susan Kolb, author of “The naked truth about breast implants.” Dr. Kolb said.

My experience in doing this for 30 years is that eventually everybody will become ill from their breast implants, unless they die sooner from something else.

Dr. Kolb says she’s seeing lots of women with mold in their saline implants, often from defective valves. She says some patients also have detoxification problems, that make them particularly sensitive to the silicone shells of the implants. She says in 25-30 percent of the population, the reactions are debilitating. The doctor is not anti-implants, she has them herself. But she believes for safety, women need to get their implants replaced every eight to fifteen years. Amanda Gilcrease is a patient who had her implants removed. She said, “All the neurological symptoms… the burning, numbing, stabbing, shooting, electrical shocking pains throughout my body went away immediately.”

Through Dr. Kolb, Anne Ziegenhorn met other women suffering the same frightening symptoms. They formed “The Implant Truth Survivors Committee” to educate women and doctors, and to force the FDA to listen. She said, “I literally willed myself to live and willed myself to get this message out here This is my purpose, this is why I’m here.”

Channel 3 called the FDA to see if they’re getting any reports of illnesses from mold in saline implants or from the silicone shells. Their spokesperson said he’s not familiar with any such reports. The agency does say that most women will eventually need to have their implants replaced.

Reference: http://www.news3lv.com/content/news/story/Florida-woman-finds-mold-in-breast-implants/XjSS-AV_6kyspkB1fmrTIA.cspx

Legionellosis Standard Provides Guidance on Risk Management Requirements

logo_ashraeATLANTA – Long awaited industry guidance on legionellosis is now available in a new standard from ASHRAE. The document establishes minimum legionellosis risk management requirements for building water systems.

“The industry interest and input into developing this standard has been tremendous,” Presidential Member Tom Watson, chair of the committee that wrote the standard, said. “With 8,000 to 10,000 cases of Legionnaires’ Disease reported each year in the United States, and with more than 10 percent of those cases fatal, it is vital that we set requirements to manage risk of this bacteria.”

Legionella can also cause a less-severe influenza-like illness known as Pontiac Fever.  Most cases of legionellosis are the result of exposure to Legionella associated with building water systems, according to Watson.

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 188-2015, Legionellosis: Risk Management for Building Water Systems, is intended for use by owners and managers of human-occupied buildings and those involved in the design, construction, installation, commissioning, operation, maintenance and service of centralized building water systems and components.

Publication of the standard coincides with ASHRAE’s 2015 Annual Conference taking place June 27-July 1, in Atlanta.

Specific requirements in the standard include:

  • Minimum Legionellosis risk management requirements for buildings and their associated potable and non-potable water systems.
  • Establishment by building owners of a Program Team and (in turn) a Water Management Program for which they are responsible in order to comply with the standard.
  • Provision of specific and detailed requirements for what Legionellosis control strategies must accomplish and how they are to be documented – but, does not provide (or place restrictions on) what specific strategies are to be used or applied.

Standard 188 consists of normative sections followed by normative and informative appendices. The normative sections and normative appendices specify the requirements to comply. The informative appendices and informative references are provided for guidance.

The cost of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 188-2015, Legionellosis: Risk Management for Building Water Systems, is $58 ($48, ASHRAE members). To order, visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore (http://www.techstreet.com/ashrae/products/1897561) or contact ASHRAE Customer Contact Center at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400 (worldwide) or fax 678-539-2129.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

 

https://ashrae.org/news/2015/legionellosis-standard-provides-guidance-on-risk-management-requirements

Arizona Virus Spreading among Kids

Arizona Virus Spreading among Kids

Baby Atlee peacefully recovers from RSV in his hospital bed

PHOENIX — Respiratory syncytial virus, a highly contagious respiratory illness in young children, has jumped by 234 percent from last year, according to documents from the Arizona Department of Health Services.

This increase is affecting families across the Phoenix area as young children show signs of what at first appears to be a common cold that quickly transforms into a virus that affects the lungs, heart or immune system.

In the 2013-2014 cold and flu season, there were 783 laboratory-confirmed cases of RSV. The number of confirmed cases shot up to 2,613 this year, a number that could continue to climb through the end of the season, according to hospital administrators. (more…)