Your Kitchen and Mold

Kitchen Mold Removal

Are you concerned that black mold could be lurking in your kitchen, perhaps hiding in the cupboards? Not only is it unattractive, it can also cause respiratory problems for your family. The following guide can help you locate, prevent and destroy any black mold that has taken up residence in your kitchen.

Where to find black mold in the kitchen?

Black mold tends to grow in dark, damp areas, which means it could be festering in a kitchen cabinet or cupboard for a long time before you uncover it. For this reason, it’s vital that you identify the areas in your kitchen that are going to be most prone to mold growth. This will give you the necessary knowledge so that you can find the problem before it gets too bad. Places to check include the following:

    • Underneath the kitchen sink. Check the cabinet bottom and the back wall where the sink pipes enter for dampness or past signs of water damage, such as bubbling or peeling surfaces. Even if black mold isn’t visible, it could be growing on the underside of the sink cabinet or behind the wallboard.
  • Under the refrigerator. A leak from a water line to the icemaker or simple condensation collection underneath the fridge could create the optimum environment for fungal growth. If your kitchen flooring looks like it has suffered water damage or if there is standing water and mildew present, black mold could also be growing under the floorboards. Also, check any cupboards near the fridge to make sure there is no moisture damage.
  • Cabinets above or next to wall mounted microwaves or oven hoods. Another common trouble spot is behind the cabinets that border microwaves and hoods. This is because moisture and condensation from cooking can accumulate in these cupboard areas, especially if ventilation is insufficient.

Kitchen mold prevention

Since prevention is key to black mold management in the home, now that you know your kitchen’s trouble spots you are better able to stop it from growing in the first place.

Begin by checking underneath the sink on a regular basis and fixing leaks immediately. Keep the sink cupboard area clean and neat so you can empty it out for a quick leak check regularly. If you are like many people and use this cupboard area for cleaning supplies, place the supplies in a handled carrier so you can quickly pull everything out. A good time to check is after you have been using the sink, such as after dishwashing. If there is a leak, it is likely going to be damp if you just drained the sink.

As for the fridge, it’s good practice to pull it out and dust the rear coils every one to two months, anyway. Simply pencil this chore into your home maintenance calendar. You can then use this opportunity to check beneath the fridge for leaks and to make sure water lines are attached and not leaking.

Finally, inspect the area around and under the cabinets, microwave, and hood after you use the oven or microwave. If you find a lot of moisture or condensation, chances are that you need to add a stronger fan or better ventilation to the kitchen.

Kitchen mold removal

Black mold can be tenacious when it comes to removal. Although you can often remove the visible black mold by yourself, there is likely hidden mold that you cannot find for removal as easily. The basic removal process is as follows:

Step 1: Testing Testing is done if there is signs of moisture but no obvious visual signs of fungal growth. Testing may also be done if there is light visible growth, since the remediation firm will need to determine the extent of the growth.
Step 2: Seal the infested area The home is sealed. This means that the area that has mold, in this case the kitchen, is sealed off from the rest of the house so that black mold removal doesn’t send spores into other areas.
Step 3: Identification and replacement The cause of moisture is identified and fixed. Otherwise, the mold will simply return if there is still a moisture source. This may mean the removal and replacement of cabinets and wallboard so they cleaning can occur under them.
Last step: Removal and cleaning The actual removal and remediation begins. The crew will use a disinfecting and cleaning solution that removes and kills the fungus. Stains from the black mold may be present on cabinets, but these can usually be painted over and repaired.

Debunking some toxic mold myths

In 2000, a new “toxic mold” panic swept the country, and after 16 years of untold lawsuits and billions of dollars spent, major myths still plague and unnecessarily panic association boards, managers and homeowners. The myths all too often cause exaggerated repairs, unduly frightened residents, and conflict. In this and the next column, I will address thirteen pervasive toxic mold myths.

1. Mold is new. Mold, one of the earliest and simplest life forms, has existed for thousands of years. Almost 100 years ago, mold was the basis of the discovery of penicillin. Mold is ever-present, as is dust or pollen.

2. The scientific and medical communities confirm mold’s many dangers. In 2004, the National Institute of Medicine published its comprehensive study on indoor mold exposure, called “Damp Indoor Spaces and Health.” A central finding was: “Scientific evidence links mold … in homes and buildings to asthma symptoms in some people with the chronic disorder, as well as to coughing, wheezing, and upper respiratory tract symptoms in otherwise healthy people… However, the available evidence does not support an association between … mold and the wide range of other health complaints that have been ascribed.”

 That sounds like mold is as dangerous as dust or pollen to people with severe asthma. The announcement containing this finding is easily located by a web search, but it did not receive much press play – stories of frightened people living in tents are more interesting.

3. One must determine the kind of mold present. Mold consultants and plaintiff attorneys often describe some molds as worse than others. The most famous mold is stachybotrys chartarum, a mold producing infinitesimal quantities of a substance similar to botulism poison. However, the amount is so small they call it a “mycotoxin.” It sounds frightening, but the scientific community long ago debunked the myth that this or any mold was somehow poisonous to breathe. For example, read the National Institute of Health Fact Sheet on Mold, found at www.niehs.nih.gov.

4. California is protected by the Toxic Mold Protection Act of 2001. The act instructed the Department of Public Health to develop permissible exposure limits of the various mold strains. However, in 2005, and again in 2008, the DPH reported the task could not be completed with the scientific information available. Consequently, there is presently no official standard as to how many mold spores of any given variety are “unhealthy.”

5. Always start with a mold test. The Environmental Protection Agency recommends against mold testing. There is no standard as to how many mold spores are “unhealthy,” and indoor air sampling tests are extremely vulnerable to events in the home, which can change the results. A recent shower, window opening or carpet cleaning are some of the many factors that can completely change test outcomes.

Mold tests, to put it bluntly, primarily frighten the occupants and create a “need” for the expense of a mold consultant, and a second test after the area is cleaned. Since the health authorities have not confirmed any particular strain is more dangerous, and since there is no official standard as to how many airborne spores are unhealthy, there is rarely a good reason to spend the money on such a test.

 

Buying a New Home? Make Sure it’s Mold-Free

Everybody would ask for a perfect home – a dream home which can be a perfect place for you and your family. It must be sanctuary that is safe and comfortable. With that being said, no one wants to buy a house with a mold problem. So, if you’re looking and planning to buy new house you must ensure that it’s free from possible mold issues. This is a substantial matter that must not be disregarded before closing a sale.
Identifying Molds to Prevent Further Problems

Aside from the fact that mold can make a house less appealing, it can also cause health problems. Some molds are visible and even odorous. They can grow in less accessible spots such as basements and attics. They can also thrive in water-soaked materials such as wallboard, painted walls, ceiling tiles, and others. Furthermore, they can survive in almost any damp location. The following are the most parts of the home which you need to watch out for molds:

  • Bathroom
  • Attic
  • Basement
  • Kitchen
  • Drywall
  • Window
  • Carpet
  • Laundry

In addition, molds often grow around leaking pipes, windows, or roofs where there is constant supply of water. Places that have been flooded and haven’t been thoroughly dried like basements can be a place where molds grow too. Make sure to check them regularly.

If you are going to buy a new house, make sure it’s mold-free. It would entail a precise manner of checking and knowledge on how to do it. If you don’t have the knowledge, it’ll be always advisable to ask help from the experts. Contacting a home inspector will be a great first step.

Keep an eye for places where water usually runs, be it in the basement or your sink. A home mold inspector can professionally inspect it before you buy your new home.

Of course, the home owner knows the property very well. Ask the seller to disclose any mold  or water damage problems. This is one way you can make a great buy. Some sellers would refuse because they want to avoid liability for any problems.  Before making any agreement or payment, make sure you get the duty of inspecting the areas yourself.

Buying a new home can be both rewarding and of course entails a responsibility as well. Nevertheless, for your peace of mind have it inspected by the professionals. You might hire a professional mold testing company. These companies can dig into walls and check the entire property to make certain it’ll be a good buy. You’ll have to decide whether the cost of removing the mold is worth the price you’ll pay, especially, when the health of a family member is at risk.

For more details and information, head up to http://funguyinspections.com/.

How Hot Summer Months Can Bring Mold Straight Into Your Home!

Summer’s Great But It Can Bring Mold Home Too

It Is Hot & Humid Outside Again

Well, the summer has more than arrived, and everybody is feeling it for the most part. The blistering heat has affected many of our daily lives, and the humidity has drenched us in sweat time, and time again. Summer does not just affect you personally, though, it affects your house too. Of course, it takes a toll on your wallet through your electric bill. Your air conditioning unit is going to have to work a lot harder to keep your house comfortable. That is not all it does, though, and the other effects can be much worse. We are talking about water damage, mold odors, and all different kinds of mold problems.

Why Is Mold So Bad in my Home?

Mold is not good for a lot of reasons. Aside from the fact that it destroys items and property, it can also make you sick. We are not just talking about regular sick like the flu either. Certain types of mold can make you really sick. Not just you either, your pets as well. If your beloved pets consume mold or breathe airborne mold in too long, they may have problems easier than you. Your children and grandparents are also more susceptible to the nasty effects of mold. With that said, mold can do a lot of damage, to you, your home, and your family. There is even a type of mold that can destroy a house over the proper amount of time if left unchecked. How can mold destroy a house, though? Every time your air conditioner clicks on and slowly cools the air, small micro-droplets of water condense on the cold coils, coalesce, and create water.  A drain usually facilitates the collection and removal of the moisture.  Yet, when the drain system backs up minor drips begin to back up, and slowly move moisture to the walls.  Along with time and moisture, mold grows a little bit like weeds as other plants do. It will grow until the space it is in does not fit it anymore. Does that mean that the mold stops growing? Absolutely not, it means that it expands the space it is in on its own.  It will fill the interior walls and spaces below your air conditioner with visible mold and mold spores inside your home.

How To Prevent Mold From Growing

There are a lot of ways to prevent different kinds of mold from growing. There are a lot of old wives tales of how to do it too, so you need to beware of these.  First, you need to know how mold grows in the first place. Mold grows when it is moist in an area with no ventilation or very little. It forms from bacteria thriving on that moisture and a lack of moving air to move it out of one particular place. Where does this normally happen, though? A lot more places than you may think.   Mold forms easily in the following places; Close off rooms and closets. Clogged air conditioning drain lines. Dirty air conditioning ducts and vents. Humid bathrooms ceilings and window frames Sink and tub drains or tile grout and even silicone water proofing seals. Damp or wet bathroom mats or towels. And that is just to name a few of the many places that mold can develop quickly. All of these are simply caused by a combination of moisture and lack of ventilation. With that said, the very air you are breathing right now might have mold particles in it from your air conditioning or other areas of your home.

Mold In Your Air Conditioning

There are a lot of causes that can create mold in your air conditioning system and a lot of areas mold can be found.  Black mold spores may be in the air conditioning coils, plenum, and even the air conditioning ducts.   You actually can prevent a fair amount of these problems simply by having your air conditioning system Inspected or cleaned out regularly. Sure you could do this yourself, but it might be better to have someone with the proper tools do it for you.  A professional Air duct cleaning company or specialized air conditioning company can usually clean your system. The price might be a tad high, but the hospital bills or funeral will not have to be covered that way. Seriously, if you have not had your system cleaned in a while, then it is probably time to get in inspected, or just do it. Black mold is one of the worst kinds of mold, period, and it grows it most air conditioning systems regularly when water damage occurs. Aside from the ducts and vents themselves, mold loves to grow in and around your air conditioning. If you have your system in the garage, closet or even the attic of your house, it might be a good idea to take a look around. You will be surprised by what you find.  Water stains, water damage, and mold growing on the drywall. Aside from hiring a professional to clean your system, you should regularly clean and make sure there is proper drainage for things like your air conditioning drain or hot water heater. Mold, dust, pet hair, and particulates that impact the air conditioning filter also significantly reduce the airflow into your house from your air conditioning. Not only will that make your system work harder to cool your house, but naturally it will cost you more money and the electric bill. It is just worth it to spend 5 minutes and inspect your air conditioning system and keep it free of all types of mold.

Steps You Can Take To A Cleaner A/c System

  1. First, you need to take a look at your vents with the air blowing to check for small debris or odors coming from it.
  1. Check or have your air conditioning filters changed routinely.  Usually every 3-6 months is recommended by most manufacturers.
  1. If you smell heavy odors coming out the closet or attic, then this is a likely sign of water damage and bacteria build up that need to be cleaned out.
  1. Keep a good eye on how often your a/c runs.  Do you hear it cycle on and off?
  1. How often are doors and windows opened?
  1. Do not run your system forever, it needs a break too.  Listen for loud system starts and stops, as this can also be a sign of a problem.

  If you don’t hear the AC cycle, or it makes really loud noises you may need to turn it off and call a professional air conditioning contractor to inspect or repair the ac unit.

What About The Rest Of The House?

  Well, it does help if you clean out things like drainage pipes in general. This covers your sink, toilet, and tub drains. You also want to wash damp clothes and linens quickly, even if they are not that dirty, as they are a breeding ground for mold and mildew. Forget the fact that is stinks, it is bad all around. Closets should be regularly cleaned, and the door left open from time to time, to allow for good ventilation. Just keep the place clean, tidy and well ventilated in general. That way you will have less of a problem with mold.   If you need help finding mold within your home be sure to call FunGuy Mold Inspections in Los Angeles.

2 + 8 =

Mold In Your Air Conditioning

There are a lot of causes that can create mold in your air conditioning system and a lot of areas mold can be found.  Black mold spores may be in the air conditioning coils, plenum, and even the air conditioning ducts.   You actually can prevent a fair amount of these problems simply by having your air conditioning system Inspected or cleaned out regularly. Sure you could do this yourself, but it might be better to have someone with the proper tools do it for you.  A professional Air duct cleaning company or specialized air conditioning company can usually clean your system. The price might be a tad high, but the hospital bills or funeral will not have to be covered that way. Seriously, if you have not had your system cleaned in a while, then it is probably time to get in inspected, or just do it. Black mold is one of the worst kinds of mold, period, and it grows it most air conditioning systems regularly when water damage occurs.

Steps You Can Take To A Cleaner A/c System

  1. First, you need to take a look at your vents with the air blowing to check for small debris or odors coming from it.
  1. Check or have your air conditioning filters changed routinely.  Usually every 3-6 months is recommended by most manufacturers.
  1. If you smell heavy odors coming out the closet or attic, then this is a likely sign of water damage and bacteria build up that need to be cleaned out.
  1. Keep a good eye on how often your a/c runs.  Do you hear it cycle on and off?
  1. How often are doors and windows opened?
  1. Do not run your system forever, it needs a break too.  Listen for loud system starts and stops, as this can also be a sign of a problem.

If you don’t hear the AC cycle, or it makes really loud noises you may need to turn it off and call a professional air conditioning contractor to inspect or repair the ac unit.

We don’t often think that our air conditioning system that cools our house can cause water damage and mold problems.  In short, an air conditioner removes moisture from the air and it naturally drains outdoors or in a dedicated drain line.  Clogging of the drain can cause water damage and real mold problems.  Learn how to prevent mold in your air conditioning system and schedule a routine inspection today.

  1. Closed Off Rooms, Closets, Doors, and Mold That Grow’s Black.
    1. Improper ventilation and increased humidity in a room or closet can cause mold growth on walls and ceilings.
    2. Not only on the surface of the walls, but also you clothes, bags, and other belongings.
    3. This problem is easy to remedy : learn more and contact funguy
  2. Clogged Air Conditioning Drain Lines.
    1. This problem can occur naturally and unless you monitor the air conditioning closet you’ll probably never know about the water damage and mold problem that exist.
    2. Some bacteria, dust, and debris built up on the coils over time can reduce air flow and increase the chance of clogging the drain, water damage, and then eventually mold.
    3. Looking for a solution to this problem, contact a funguy mold inspector today to look at your air condition system.
  3. 4 Steps to a Cleaner Air Conditioning System
    1. Look: Do you notice fiber glass, heavy dust, or odors coming from the air conditioning ducts or registers?.  This could be a sign of contamination.
    2. Smell: Check for  heavy or unusual odors coming from normal operation of your air conditioning system?
    3. Monitor: Overuse, opening doors, and Improper cycling can cause continuous running of the system and blockages.
    4. Listen: Do you notice that air conditioner never shuts off and on?  Listen closely, does it run continuously?    A healthy air conditioner will cycle on and off during normal operations.  Of course upon starting up and heavier indoor loads an air conditioner will run to meet demand.

Maintenance – Contact a certified mold inspector or air conditioning specialist for maintenance and scheduled maintenance plans today.