Water is one of the fundamental necessities for life on this planet, and is a critical ingredient in many substances.  You, yourself, are almost 60% water.  We drink it, bathe in it, swim in it, eat food grown with it – the list goes on and on.  Considering how ubiquitous, essential, and common water is, it’s all the more amazing that it can also do such devastating damage.  Water is one of the biggest hazards in the home.  Unwanted moisture and water damage can contribute to a myriad of home problems, health problems, and can even render your home uninhabitable.

Today, we’re going to look specifically at water damage and wood flooring.  We’ll explore the sources of water damage that can have an impact on flooring.  Additionally, we’ll talk about the various categories of water damage, and how they dictate different levels of inspection, remediation, and restoration response. 

Then, we’ll look at what water does to wood floors, and talk a bit about the different kinds of wood floors and how they respond and handle this damage.  Next, we’ll focus on the key hazards created by water damage to wood flooring – not just physical and aesthetic problems, but much more serious health hazards like mold, mildew, bacteria, and fungal growth. 

Further, we’ll look at the different steps for identifying water damage, inspecting for water damage, and hiring professionals to remediate and restore your wood flooring.  Finally, we’ll talk about one of the premiere testing companies who can help inspect and determine the extent and impact of water damage on your wood floors – FunGuy Inspections. 

Where Does Water Damage Come From?

Water damage can have a diverse range of causes, both natural and man-made.  In some cases, water damage is very obvious, from things like floods.  In other cases, signs may be less obvious, especially in the case of slow leaks from appliances and the like.  Some of the most common causes of water damage to wood flooring include, but are not limited to:

  • Natural disasters such as excessive rainfall, hurricanes, and floods.
  • Leaking appliances, home heating and cooling systems, washer/dryer units, refrigerators, and similar.
  • Leaking plumbing lines in the home (common with fridge/freezer water/ice lines, older service lines, etc.).
  • Overflowing or leaking toilets, sinks, washer/dryers, showers, bathtubs, etc.
  • Catastrophic plumbing failures or other household incidents leading to large liquid releases.
  • Cracked foundation slabs allowing moisture in from below the floor or all around from natural rainfall and runoff activity.
  • Minor spills in the home, depending on the type of flooring, quantity of liquid spilled, and how long it goes unaddressed. 
  • Overflowing gutters, a leaky roof, damaged seals on windows, and so on, allowing in rain/snow/ice or just excessive moisture and humidity.

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